The Camera, the Tripod & the Wardrobe

The technique which most fascinated me in MEDA101 this semester (and which I subsequently decided to focus my final piece on) was continuity editing. I used various shots to narrate Olivia’s movements. A scene from the film The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005) had resonated with me for some time. When I viewed it more recently, I noticed the cleverness of the continuity edits and thus decided to replicate that scene for my project.

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Subverting Cinematic Conventions

Creativity in cinema often comes from escaping conventions, or developing new ones. As such, cinema has been revolutionary media in multiple periods in time, not just when it became mainstream in the 1920’s. This often stems from significant political or social change; including sexual revolution, civil rights and wars.

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Discontinuity Editing

Discontinuity Mark Cousins once said that continuity editing is the equivalent of using the word “then” in a story. There are three general formats of continuity editing; Temporal connections: the relationship between a symptom and result, for example one shot may show a glass being pushed off a table and the second will show glass […]

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Cinematography

Cinematography is the union of art and technology. Its techniques and practices cannot be judged alone. Effective cinematography is that which works for the film and its context. Roles on a film set which integrate to create cinematography include the screenwriter,  director, actors and producer above the line. Below the line, important roles include that […]

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The Sound of Technological Singularity

For my second instalment (view my first here) of Where I’m From, I decided to take a generational approach rather than a personal one. We are digital natives; we were effectively born inside computers and this has had a huge impact on the meaning of our lives. The world has become a computer in itself. This […]

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The Ups & Downs of Remoscope Footage

The remoscope focuses on the art of restraint; it contains a set of ‘rules’ for the artist, developed by the Lumiere Brothers (the two esh lads in the candid below): 60 seconds maximum duration The camera must be fixed on one frame (with a tripod) No sound No zoom, edit, or otherwise effects (source) Sounds pretty simple, huh? […]

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